Podcast: Elaine Taylor-Klaus and Diane Dempster: Supporting Parents of Complex Kids

In today’s episode, I sit down with Elaine Taylor-Klaus and Diane Dempster from Impact Parents to discuss the intricacies of modern parenting. We delve into the challenges of setting expectations, raising ‘complex kids,’ and the evolving roles parents play in their children’s lives. Join us as we uncover the secrets to a more fulfilling and less anxiety-driven approach to parenting.

TRANSCRIPT

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

complex kids are kids who struggle with some aspects of life, learning behavior or social issues, but not all. But if kids are struggling in some way to navigate or master the expectations of them around life and learning, then then they’re probably a complex kid. And these days, I think we’ve got a lot of complex kids. Diane alluded to this earlier, we’re raising kids in complex times. And so kids who may not have been neurodivergent, became complex kids during COVID, and have become complex kids in the context of excessive access to technology. And like the world is shifting in a way that’s creating complexity for us to parent and is really calling upon us to parent differently than our parents did.

Sheila Akbar: 

Today, I’m really excited, as I always am to bring a really cool set of guests to you. These are two women that I’ve known for several years now. And the work that they do is so needed, and just so fantastic. And every time I listened to them, I learned something new about just how to work with others, whether it’s my clients, my students, my colleagues, my partner, my own kid, they’re just a wealth of information and knowledge on the coach approach to relationships. So let me introduce them formally. Elaine Taylor, Klaus and Diane Dempster co founded impact parents.com in 2011, because traditional parenting advice wasn’t working for their complex kids. And they found no training or coaching available, designed specifically to support them as parents of complex kids. Now internationally recognized as leading parent educators in the world, they use a coach approach to help parents reduce the stress of raising children, teens and young adults with ADHD anxiety, autism, learning differences and more. The creators of Saturday school behavior training, they’re authors of many books, including parenting ADHD, now easy intervention strategies to empower kids with ADHD, and the Essential Guide to raising complex kids with ADHD, anxiety and more. So as I said, every time I listen to them, I am just blown away. We recently did a series of talks together that were similarly impactful. So I’m so glad they agreed to be on the podcast and talk to all of us today about their work, and how they work to support parents of complex kids. And what are complex kids? Do you have one? So take a listen. And I hope you enjoy it. Well, Diana, and Elaine, thank you so much for joining me today. I’m really excited for this conversation.

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

So excited to be with you always actually

Diane Dempster: 

always, always, always.

Sheila Akbar: 

Let’s start by just having you tell us about the work that you do. And then what your journey was to getting into this work.

Diane Dempster: 

Oh, the backstory, right? So how did we start into this work? So I started into this work in 2008, I left corporate, like about a million other people. And I just got to decide what I wanted to be when I grew up, and decided to go and get my certification as a professional coach. And about the same time my one of my kids was diagnosed with ADHD. And so started looking at how do I support this child, I’m a neurotypical adult, is a type eight, get it done, mom with this quirky kid that wasn’t quite fitting in the mold and decided I wanted to help him help that community do something in that realm. And in the process of becoming a coach, realize that I was doing a lot of my own work. And that by doing my own inner work, it was really helping me to support my kiddos in a very different way. And so the shortcut answer is when I became a coach, I became a much better parent. And when I met Elaine, she had had similar experiences, but we came from different Personality types of different backgrounds, that sort of stuff. And so we came together and said, Well, what can we do to support the ADHD community and realize that the support that was lacking at the time was supporting parents and that we both had felt very isolated, very marginalized, even about, you know, with kids as they got diagnosed or not diagnosed, and those sorts of things align, what would you add to the backstory?

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

Clearly, when we became coaches, we became, I would say, significantly better parents to our complex kids. And it wasn’t rocket science. It was something we could teach. But for me, my story started differently. I actually came into coaching to support parents specifically, because I had I had been struggling mightily as a parent of a really complex kid. Several It’s about one super complex by now we’ve come to call very complex. And there’s just I was lost. And I was overwhelmed. And I didn’t at that time know that I had my own learning and attention issues that was diagnosed a little later. And I just needed some help. And the only thing available to me at the time was a therapist, which was helpful for a while, but it wasn’t really what I needed, I needed a Sherpa, you know, I needed someone to guide me through the process and help me make sense of it all. And coaching was introduced to me as a modality to like, manage it all. So I was actually on my way back to graduate school to become a therapist to work with parents, when I was introduced to coaching and I called my husband the first afternoon in tears. And I said, this is it, I found it like, this is what it’s about. Because coaching is an empowerment based approach. And it’s a change management based approach. So it’s all about how do we meet these amazing, quirky kids where they are, and help them become step into their full potential in a way that is inspiring and empowering to them. And to me as a parent, because I was so lost in the process. And coaching really, as Diane said, it gave, you know, quote, The secret to coaching is it’s the best kept personal development secret in the world, is to get coach training. And so I really shifted who I was being as a parent, and it was more about who I was being than what I was doing.

Sheila Akbar: 

That’s so wonderful to hear. And I hear from both of you just the, you know, enthusiasm and passion and dripping from your voices when you talk about this. And it’s one of the reasons I love hearing you talk about the work you do. What does that look like when you work with with parents?

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

Well, I would say the secret sauce is that we bring coaching skills and communication skills to parents of complex kids. Often we say to the parents, of complex kids and the professionals who support them. And and so we do this, this hybrid combination of training with coaching and support, we originally started off thinking we’re going to do peer coaching. And it became very clear that in this audience, there was a training component that was really needed. So we do kind of coach assaulting, I think is how we would describe it. But it’s it’s bringing the philosophies and the tools and the constructs from coaching to the family space as a way to really foster independence and personal development and growth because complex kids are a personal growth development opportunity. Right? They need more conscious personal development and growth than neurotypical kids.

Diane Dempster: 

The other piece I would add is that there’s so much information out there, right? It’s this sort of, there’s so many podcasts, great podcasts like yours like ours, like everything else, webinars, I mean, everything else, and parents tend to get stuck in information. And that’s really where coaching helps is this sort of I can take what I’m learning, figure out how do I make it work for me? How do I make it work for my family? What do I do if it doesn’t work more than once? You know, it’s this sort of how do I make it sustainable and personalized is kind of the way I talk about it is this sort of, I need more than just information most of us particularly because a lot of if kids have our neuro divergent, their parents and percentage wise are likely the same way or they’re really stressed and overwhelmed, which makes us feel like we’re neuro divergent. And so it’s hard to do the things that the experts tell us. And that’s really where coaching comes in. Because it’s about meeting you where you are, wow, I’m having a hard time. Mom yesterday us like, I know I’m supposed to be consistent, but I have a really hard time being consistent. And that consistency is a four letter word for a lot of people, right? I know it is for me. And it’s like, okay, so let’s help you figure you’re not a consistent human. That’s cool. That’s who you are. Let’s not make that right or wrong. Let’s figure out how to work around that and figure out, are there things that you could do that might be more towards what people would call consistent? And are there things that the variety makes it easier?

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

So what you’re describing, and the way we often talk about it is taking the information and integrating it and then implementing it, but to focus on what you’re trying to achieve and to focus on the process rather than the tool. So instead of you’ve got to be consistent. Well, what’s important about consistency, what are you trying to achieve by being consistent in a child’s life? Then how do you design a system or a structure or an approach that meets that need in a way that works for the parent, that’s the shift is that we’re focusing on the process, instead of only the outcome because you can give any parent in the world a reward chart, but that doesn’t mean it’s gonna work.

Diane Dempster: 

Well, and it’s not just about the process for the parent, but it’s also the process for the kid which is what you just described with our kids. We’re not just focused on how do I get them to To turn in their homework, how do I get them to hang up their towel? How do I get them to do the thing that I need them to do today? It’s the process of figuring out, wow, it’s hard for me to remember stuff. If I need to remember something, what’s something that might work for me? Because ultimately, we’re trying to launch independent strong adults, right? Not just get this stuff done today.

Sheila Akbar: 

Right.

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

I don’t want to be testing to make sure the toothbrushes wet, right, when they’re 18 years old, I want to make sure that they’ve got some buy in and know how to get themselves to brush their teeth, even when they’re tired at the end of the day.

Sheila Akbar: 

Right. Right. So let’s back up a little bit. Elaine, you use the term complex kids? Can you tell us what you mean by that?

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

So the definition has morphed over the years when I when I read the central guide, my my editor asked me to define it. So I spent a little time playing with it. I think the shorthand version is complex. Kids are kids who struggle with some aspects of life, learning behavior, or social issues, but not all. But if kids are struggling, in some way to navigate or master the expectations of them around life and learning, then then they’re probably a complex kid. And these days, I think we’ve got a lot of complex kids. Diane alluded to this earlier, we’re raising kids in complex times. And so kids who may not have been neurodivergent, became complex kids during COVID, and have become complex kids in the context of excessive access to technology. And like the world is shifting in a way that’s creating complexity for us to parent and is really calling upon us to parent differently than our parents did, or even than we were raised to.

Diane Dempster: 

Well and what you’re describing, like love that word struggle, right kids who struggle with right, and so everybody struggles at some point. And a lot of times our kids are struggling, and they aren’t even aware that they’re struggling. And so if that’s the cool thing about what we do is that you don’t have to have a kid with ADHD or anxiety, or autism, or whatever the label happens to be. You’ve got a kid who’s struggling, these are just amazing tools that you can use to support them in navigating through the struggles, and beginning to figure out how do I navigate struggles on my own?

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

Well, and Diane and I’ve been playing with this a little bit lately, but we do what we call neurodiversity inclusive coaching. That’s the work that we do. That’s what we teach. And what we realized is there’s this whole vehicle out there of ADHD coaching and your work, you do executive function, a lot of work around executive function coaching. And what we do for parents is neurodiversity inclusive coaching, right? So it’s all aspects of neuro divergence and how it shows up. And how do you integrate that and make it work in the world?

Sheila Akbar: 

Yeah, one of the things I want to pull back out of what Diane was saying earlier with this conversation, you were recounting with a mom, who seems like she was feeling a lot of shame around consistency. And you also mentioned the expectations that are put on these kids and the struggles they may have meeting those expectations. I think one of the most amazingly empowering parts of coaching is that it’s a totally judgment free practice, right? And yes, it’s so wonderful. And it’s when we can create that space and that trust with a teenager. You know, they always amaze you, and for parents to be able to create that relationship with their teenagers. I mean, that’s everything we could always hope for. Right. But I think that parents are plagued with a lot of shame, and a lot of expectations, particularly women, right. So talk to us a little bit about that, how that shows up in your work and the kinds of things that you encourage parents to think about, if they’re struggling with shame.

Diane Dempster: 

I want to pull those apart, because absolutely shame, absolutely expectations. What was coming up for me as you were segwaying, there, Sheila is, parents will say, Well, yeah, I can be non judgmental, I can meet my kid where they are, I can give them space to develop and grow and be three to five years behind their peers. But the world’s not gonna let them do that. And they’re not, you know, it’s this sort of, there’s this pressure, we feel because we have a story about the external expectations right or wrong, it’s yes, often it is true. And what it does, it pushes us into this space where we’re driving our kids as much as we think the outside world might eventually drive them. And that creates a barrier to change because what you were alluding to is that the connection and the space and the relationship is really what has to happen. And if we’re so focused on the expectation, we’re not focusing on the relationship piece of it.

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

I’m thinking about you know, the name of the podcast, right is don’t force it. And there’s something so what you’re speaking to is the parents relationship with the child or the kids in terms of the relationship with shame and judgment. And I was listening to your question as if parent with neuro divergence, thinking about the shame that I experienced as a parent with when I would do everything the experts told me to do, and it wouldn’t work. And then I would feel like oh my god, I’m now I’m really a failure, or something’s really wrong with my kids. And what what we hear from parents a great deal in our community. And we talk about the judgment free zone, right? Is this is the first time they’ve ever felt not judged, where they’re getting some permission to let go of the shame, and the blame and the embarrassment. And you know, especially those of us who ever own nerd virgins, it is really hard to raise these kids sometimes, and to see your kids not hitting the same metrics that your peers kids are hitting, or that you think they’re hitting, they may or may not be. And because everybody comes in thinking, they’re the only ones and then they come into our communities, and they come into our groups, and they’re like, Oh, my God, all these other parents all over the world, and all over the country are saying the same thing, I had no idea. And that’s so powerful. It’s so powerful to realize you’re not alone. And that if we can put down the stick, that we’ve been beating ourselves over the head with all these years, and sort of give ourselves permission to be with the kids, we’ve got not the kids we thought we should have. It changes everything. Absolutely everything. But our shame can interfere so powerfully with our capacity to be with our kids that we actually end up projecting the shame onto them.

Sheila Akbar: 

Yeah and interfering with their development.

Diane Dempster: 

Yeah, well, and we’re fighting the tide, you know, as you’re talking about, you know, putting the stick down, Elena was thinking about how many as adults, it’s like, we motivate ourselves, by like, beating ourselves up, it’s like, you know, I gotta achieve I gotta do I gotta work complex. And, and it works, right. And part of it is just the place our society is right now, not to make it right or wrong, but it’s the reality of it. And so if we want to do it differently, there’s this space, we need to move into to say, Okay, wait a second, I gotta find something else to do besides beat myself up, because we all still need motivation, and inspiration and all those things to accomplish the stuff of life. But if it’s not pressure, then what is it?

Sheila Akbar: 

Yeah, is it? Yeah, am I getting anywhere? If I’m not like in pain while I’m doing it?

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

Well think about how many times you you see somebody you haven’t seen in a while? How are you? And there’s this almost status people carry to Oh, I’m so busy.

Sheila Akbar: 

Yeah

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

Oh, I’ve got so much. There’s so much it’s like, and I remember saying to myself, I’m going to stop using the word busy. And I started just saying life is full. That’s a great shift, right? Because I want to see the joy in it, not just it’s not like I don’t want my busyness to be some status that I’m you know, achieving or something. So, in our group this week, we do a coaching group that meets twice a month. And there’s a different theme each week. And this week’s theme was what we call shifting expectations. And we’re setting realistic expectations. And what I found myself talking about with the parents this week, wasn’t about our expectations of the kids, but it was about helping kids think about their expectations for themselves. And the ways in which they take on expectations that may be unrealistic, or they’re they take on expectations, because they think they’re supposed to or, and to really begin to guide kids to that ownership we were talking about earlier, by helping them begin to set expectations for themselves. It’s a shift, but it’s really powerful.

Sheila Akbar: 

But that shift that I think we all kind of see, we need to make, right? We don’t want to sort of sell our kids into the cycle of burnout that we find ourselves on. And and I think it has so much to do with a lot of these external factors, like the fact that, you know, there are more women in the workplace. And as women, we are still struggling with, well, how do I balance being a mom and doing it all at work as well. And we’re really the first generation to have to navigate that at, you know, such a large percentage. And it’s tough, right? I know, so many people who feel like, they’re just on all the time, and they are full time mom and also executive, whatever, right? But it does strike me that our generation has a chance to break some cycles, some really, really important cycles to break. And I think that the work is not just on our kids. And I look at Gen Z and younger generations and I’m always just so impressed with the way they raise the bar for how we should treat each other, how we should take care of each other and the earth and think about things differently and just applaud it so much. But it’s on us to write the work of breaking a cycle is is really difficult and it starts with that sort of inner work and changing the way we show up in relationships and how we’re being not necessary. I like what we’re doing like you settling?

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

Exactly, exactly. And I mean, there’s a book that a colleague of ours came out with last year about ADHD and women with ADHD and the traditional role of women and how much harder it is because of the expectations. And I think Diane and I are just old enough where we can look at our generation versus your generation. And I see, it’s so much better already. And your generation, and then I know that my kids expectations of what is equality in a marriage is going to be completely different from what it was when we stepped into marriage, you know, 30 years ago. So the change is happening, sometimes it’s hard to see it when you’re in it. And so but when you pull back, there really is a huge shift in how younger people are setting boundaries and setting limits and setting expectations in a different way than we ever even thought we were allowed to.

Diane Dempster: 

Well, and then there’s this balance of because we’re all existing at the same time, the expectations are still there, and the call to take care of each other is still there. And there’s this beautiful dynamic of both and finding that space. And that’s, to me, that’s just the beautiful aspect of the whole thing.

Sheila Akbar: 

So you know, when I think about the work you do when I talk to my clients about the work you do, because I really do think every one of my clients should be working with you. Because we can’t just, you know, fix things for the kid and not think about the conditions in the home and parenting relationships and things like that. I wonder if you could talk a little bit more about what you do to help parents really define their roles in their relationships with their with their kids, and how that can really help in a home where there are maybe complex adults as well as complex kids.

Diane Dempster: 

So the framework that we talked about, talks about four different roles of the parent, the director, the collaborator, the supporter, and the champion. And, you know, I think that word director, we all know what that word inherently means you’re the lead, you’re setting the pace, you’re creating the motivation, you’re, you know, I have this visual of ducks following the little mama across the pond, right. And we have this dream of when our kids are independent, and they’re doing the things and we’re just there to smile and champion and those sorts of things. And the real work really lives in the middle. And most of us don’t have the skills it takes. We’re just talking to a group about this today. It’s like, we know what collaboration looks like in the workplace, collaboration at home, that’s what does that even look like when our teens are fighting us? And they don’t want to talk to us they don’t want anything to do with is like, how do I collaborate with this human that won’t even talk to me half the time, right? It’s the sort of the dance is figuring out how to be in supporting and collaborating iteratively as your kids are needing or not needing or not acknowledging, needing the various levels of support.

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

So what’s coming up for me is that we’re about taking a coach approach. And, and on a fundamental level coaching is about being for other, it’s about creating a space to allow another person to reach their full potential, which is what ideally, I believe parenting should be about. And I think part of the parenting journey for a lot of people is to figure out how it is to step out of, I’m supposed to make this kid do B x. And shifting out of that into how do I kind of like allow the figure to emerge from the stone, right? How do I allow this human being to unfold into their full potential. And that’s a very different framework for parenting, then what most of us were raised with, and I think that’s what coaching leads us to, but it relies on a certain amount of trust that this person is going to end up being like, I mean, I deal with it, I have really independent young adult children. And I was talking to my mother about it today is 87. And, you know, and she was because we’re talking about the problem with raising these really independent kids is then they become really independent thinkers. And that’s what we want for them on some level, but not all parents, I think, do what my mother was saying she did want it. And it turned out okay for her, you know, but it is a little scary because you can’t you’re not controlling them. And you don’t get to control the narrative when you foster independence.

Diane Dempster: 

Right. Well, and I think it’s funny because you were using the word full potential and what was coming up for me almost like as a triggered is like, I hear parents say all the time, but he’s not reaching his full potential. He’s not working to his full potential, right? It’s this sort of, there’s this story of what we have Have what their full potential is. And then there’s a difference, which is just the stone revealing itself into the sculpture, which is what we’re alluding to. And it’s like, how do we not put our expectations of what full potential means on our kids and just let them emerge, however, they’re going to emerge without the pressure of, Oh, I gotta make it look a certain way. Or they’ve got to make it look a certain way.

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

Well, but there’s a whole, there’s a whole bunch of trust involved in that. And I think that’s a trust that that a lot of parents, a lot of people are afraid of, yeah, what happens when people because they’re going to become more independent, they’re gonna go on on a path, that may not be the path you expected for them. I mean, I certainly never expected my kids to become artists and actors. And like, you know, I was an academic, I thought, you know, like, I didn’t expect it. And this is who they are.

Sheila Akbar: 

Yeah, one of the things I talk about with our clients who are embarking on the college admissions process, which I really see as sort of a microcosm of raising a child. It’s like the boss fight at the end of raising a child for a lot of people, right. But one of the things I tell them to do as they embark is to get really clear about what they’re afraid of. Because if they don’t know, then that fear is going to drive the process, right, they’re always going to feel behind.

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

You’re talking about the parent or their kid.

Sheila Akbar: 

The parent, the parent. It’s going to their fear is going to get in the way of the student. And it’s going to get in the parents way, too. And the parent is just going to drive themselves crazy thinking they did something wrong, or they’re behind schedule, or we need to do more, because we’re aiming for this or that school. But most of the time, their fixation on a particular school is based on a fear that their child won’t get to be who they think their child should be. Right. And that’s, that’s so much about them, and not anything to do with their kid.

Diane Dempster: 

And by the way, if you’re operating from fear, you know, you’re not as creative. You’re not as collaborative, you’re not as problem solving, focused or just

Sheila Akbar: 

Or collaborative. Yeah, right, exactly. So much harder to ask for help when you’re when you’re paralyzed in your own fear.

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

Oh, it’s such a, that’s such a brilliant point. You know, as a parent who had one kid who didn’t go to college, which was really weird and hard for me, one who did and went, you know, that traditional high end, and then one who got into the process and said, You guys are making this way too complicated. I’m applying to two schools. And that I was able to support him in making that choice was only because thank you for that observation. We have done the work to not worry about what was going to happen as a result. But that was my third kid. And a lot of years of work. Yeah, you had some experience. Yeah, you know, it, this is at the end of the day, what you’re speaking to what you started with the beginning Diana’s that the work of parenting is about the parent, right? Like the kid becomes this beautiful piece of art as a result, when you allow it to emerge from the stone, but the work is our own deep work as parents.

Diane Dempster: 

Well. And the thing that we that I think, Sheila, you said, as we were getting ready for the record, and you said, you know, parents create the conditions for success. That’s our job, parents create the conditions for success, we’re not there to create the success, or manage the success, we’re there to create the conditions for success. And ultimately, honestly, guys, we don’t know what success really looks like. And we don’t know ultimately, what the conditions are, that will make that happen. So we just sometimes have to just do the best we can and lean into that trust that we’ve been talking about through this whole piece of it. And that’s got to be the hardest part of it is because fear makes us micromanage we can let go, we can see the beauty and let it come out.

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

So back to that question about what’s a complex kid? Yes to everything you just said, Diane, and when you have complex kids, it kind of amps it all up another layer. Because there is reason to be concerned that the kids not going to make it kids not going to be successful. The data is against us. The stats are you know, like, there are real concerns when you have kids with neuro divergence. When you have kids with executive function challenges. There are more obstacles on their path. And that doesn’t mean that they can’t be successful, but at all because they can be amazingly successful. But what I think it does mean is that it’s all the more important that we help them understand themselves well enough so that they want to take ownership of themselves so we can help them learn to navigate and manage themselves. Because the kids were talking about really back to the beginning of this conversation really need to be in the process of problem solving for themselves. They have to have a sense of ownership in order to be successful. When they do, they soar. Because these kids are, they’re going to be amazing adults, you just got to get them there. And part of getting them there is getting them bought in to accepting that they have challenges to overcome. And they had these extraordinary gifts. And it’s the blend of the two. That is their brilliance.

Sheila Akbar: 

That was really beautifully said, Elaine, I think that’s probably a great place to leave it. If people want to know more about what you do or set up a time to talk to you. How can they do that?

Diane Dempster: 

So we have a free, do we have a free guide?

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

We could

Sheila Akbar: 

And you’re welcome to. We’ll link in the show notes. Yeah.

Diane Dempster: 

So let’s put a free guide at impactparents.com/force. And we’ll put a free guide out there about really understanding your role versus your child’s role in terms of getting help. So it’s this sort of when is when is your child ready to get support versus when is the support focus more to be on you.

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

And the other thing else shares that we have a ton of resources on our website at impact. parents.com will give you access to download a free gift. And we encourage you to in all your free time, go play a little bit on the site. Because there’s a really robust blog, there’s the podcasts that we’ve had 12 years of guest expert columns, there’s really an extraordinary amount of material there to help you begin to see the world through the lens of a coach approach to parenting, and we invite you to come play with us and join us on our journey. It’s transformational. And really what I will say when Diane and I first started, our first tagline was enjoy the ride. And we shifted it because a lot of parents didn’t believe that that was even possible. And so we shifted it to helping parents help kids but but the secret sauce. The truth is that this approach to being in the world, as a parent is a clear path to enjoy the ride of parenting. And so we invite people to join us on that journey.

Sheila Akbar: 

That’s great. Well, thank you again so much for joining us. I’m sure we’ll have you back to talk more specifics around some of this stuff. on a future episode too.

Elaine Taylor-Klaus: 

Thanks so much, Sheila.

Diane Dempster: 

Thanks, Sheila.

Sheila Akbar: 

Well, folks, thanks for joining us. I know we’re getting into the last month of the year and things can be very stressful academically for your kids, not only with finals coming up, just the the wintertime kind of drudgery. And then for some of you the end of the college process, and know that this part of the year just gets so stressful and you feel like you’re racing against the clock. I want to encourage you to ask for help. You’ve got lots of people in your community and on your team who can help you whether that’s your kids, college counselor, friends who’ve been through this experience before, private counselors like me and my team, I’ve got a whole community that is free and available to you on circle called How to get into college where you can look at old webinars, find really helpful blogs and tips and even come to office hours to get your problem solved with me directly. So I hope you don’t hesitate to ask for help. I know so much of this is about your kids being willing to ask for help and hope you hopefully you learned a little bit about something and in today’s episode on how to create the conditions for that sort of willingness to ask for help. And good luck with everything. And we’ll see you next time.

Signet Education

Signet Education